Liberty Just in Case

A Dialogue for the September 12th World

Archive for October 17th, 2005

The Drop-off & The Re-start

Posted by zaphriel on October 17, 2005

As the day I have been waiting for approaches near and my dear Wookie starts her final preparations to return to “Normal” life, a life I know first hand that will never be “normal” again, my time for all things non-family is growing tight. Besides cleaning the house so it doesn’t look like livestock have been living here for the past six months, I am also wrapping up the most recent class of Imagery graduates at my work. You see, they go to the school that my wife is currently at, and then they come to me. I am simultaneously concluding their training, and tying up details for the next class, which will include my wife as one of the students. I want things to be fully online for her, but at the same time there are ethics rules that preclude me from being her instructor (the whole sleeping with the teacher thing.) so I must also train up and refresh some of my co-workers to take my place in my portions of the course.

All of that combined is stressful, not to mention, my wife and I must once again readjust to each other, that is always the hardest part of long deployments. However this time it is she that has done the big changing. She is the one that just finished one of the hardest technical schools in the entire Air Force, changing the entire dynamic of our life. Her experience at this school has been almost completely different from mine, but the result is the same, once one goes through this school, you never look at anything the same again. Because of the training you look at buildings and think, “How do I bring this down? Where is the weak point?”, you no longer see airplanes, you see “747’s, or BAe Hawk’s” etc… When you see two people fighting you analyze their styles, and try to glean the causes of their current conflict.

Point being, she is now a whole lot more like me, and I after having to take care of the cherub for an extended period of time, am more like her. Hopefully that means we are closer together and not just re-crossing paths as we sail into the night.

My mind weighs heavy with nervousness and excitement as the days tick by. Eight more days until I see my Wookie again. Eight more days until we start the journey of our life again, on the ship that is our family that has been moored to the dock for the past 6 months. So if I don’t write a whole lot over the next few weeks, now you know why.

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The Greatest Game Ever Played

Posted by Mark on October 17, 2005

The Greatest Game Ever Played: Harry Vardon, Francis Ouimet, and the Birth of Modern Golf

Look, I don’t play golf. Never have, probably never will. I suspect many of my readers don’t play either. But don’t let that stop you from reading this book, or seeing the movie for that matter. The accomplishments of Francis Ouimet, and Harry Vardon, for that matter, deserve to be known. You will find yourself cheering and crying at the same time throughout this book. And you’ll get a glimpse of life in the early 20th century that few history books could ever give.

Posted in War and Terror | Leave a Comment »

We Are Winning

Posted by Mark on October 17, 2005

This deserves to be read. And then read again. I’ve copied it completely, something I seldom do. Please read it, then go to the link to see who wrote it.
Why? Because I know for a stone cold fact that my friends on the left will immediately discount this editorial once they see the author. They do this at their own intellectual peril.

No better analysis has been done on the current Miers debate, or conservatism in general:

I love being a conservative. We conservatives are proud of our philosophy. Unlike our liberal friends, who are constantly looking for new words to conceal their true beliefs and are in a perpetual state of reinvention, we conservatives are unapologetic about our ideals. We are confident in our principles and energetic about openly advancing them. We believe in individual liberty, limited government, capitalism, the rule of law, faith, a color-blind society and national security. We support school choice, enterprise zones, tax cuts, welfare reform, faith-based initiatives, political speech, homeowner rights and the war on terrorism. And at our core we embrace and celebrate the most magnificent governing document ever ratified by any nation–the U.S. Constitution. Along with the Declaration of Independence, which recognizes our God-given natural right to be free, it is the foundation on which our government is built and has enabled us to flourish as a people.

We conservatives are never stronger than when we are advancing our principles. And that’s the nature of our current debate over the nomination of Harriet Miers. Will she respect the Constitution? Will she be an originalist who will accept the limited role of the judiciary to interpret and uphold it, and leave the elected branches–we, the people–to set public policy? Given the extraordinary power the Supreme Court has seized from the representative parts of our government, this is no small matter. Roe v. Wade is a primary example of judicial activism. Regardless of one’s position on abortion, seven unelected and unaccountable justices simply did not have the constitutional authority to impose their pro-abortion views on the nation. The Constitution empowers the people, through their elected representatives in Congress or the state legislatures, to make this decision.

Abortion is only one of countless areas in which a mere nine lawyers in robes have imposed their personal policy preferences on the rest of us. The court has conferred due process rights on terrorists detained at Guantanamo Bay and benefits on illegal immigrants. It has ruled that animated cyberspace child pornography is protected speech, but certain broadcast ads aired before elections are illegal; it has held that the Ten Commandments can’t be displayed in a public building, but they can be displayed outside a public building; and the court has invented rationales to skirt the Constitution, such as using foreign law to strike down juvenile death penalty statutes in over a dozen states.

For decades conservatives have considered judicial abuse a direct threat to our Constitution and our form of government. The framers didn’t create a judicial oligarchy. They created a representative republic. Our opposition to judicial activism runs deep. We’ve witnessed too many occasions where Republican presidents have nominated the wrong candidates to the court, and we want more assurances this time–some proof. The left, on the other hand, sees the courts as the only way to advance their big-government agenda. They can’t win national elections if they’re open about their agenda. So, they seek to impose their policies by judicial fiat. It’s time to call them on it. And that’s what many of us had hoped and expected when the president made his nomination.

Some liberal commentators mistakenly view the passionate debate among conservatives over the Miers nomination as a “crackup” on the right. They are giddy about “splits” in the conservative base of the GOP. They are predicting doom for the rest of the president’s term and gloom for Republican electoral chances in 2006. As usual, liberals don’t understand conservatives and never will.

The Miers nomination shows the strength of the conservative movement. This is no “crackup.” It’s a crackdown. We conservatives are unified in our objectives. And we are organized to advance them. The purpose of the Miers debate is to ensure that we are doing the very best we can to move the nation in the right direction. And when all is said and done, we will be even stronger and more focused on our agenda and defeating those who obstruct it, just in time for 2006 and 2008. Lest anyone forget, for several years before the 1980 election, we had knockdown battles within the GOP. The result: Ronald Reagan won two massive landslides.

The real crackup has already occurred–on the left! The Democratic Party has been hijacked by 1960s retreads like Howard Dean; billionaire eccentrics like George Soros; and leftwing computer geeks like Moveon.org. It nominated John Kerry, a notorious Vietnam-era antiwar activist, as its presidential standard-bearer. Its major spokesmen are old extremists like Ted Kennedy and new propagandists like Michael Moore. Its great presidential hope is one of the most divisive figures in U.S. politics, Hillary Clinton. And its favorite son is an impeached, disbarred, held-in-contempt ex-president, Bill Clinton. The Democratic Party today is split over the war and a host of cultural issues, such as same-sex marriage and partial birth abortion. It wants to raise taxes, but dares not say so. It can’t decide what message to convey to the American people or how to convey it. And even its once- reliable allies in the big media aren’t as influential in promoting the party and its agenda as they were in the past. The new media–talk radio, the Internet and cable TV–not only have a growing following, but have helped expose the bias and falsehoods of the big-media, e.g., Dan Rather, CBS News and the forged National Guard documents. Hence, circulation and audience is down, and dropping. The American left is stuck trying to repeat the history of its presumed glory years. They hope people will see Iraq as Vietnam, the entirety of the Bush administration as Watergate and Hurricane Katrina as the Great Depression. Beyond looking to the past for their salvation, the problem is that they continue to deceive even themselves. None of their comparisons are true. Meanwhile, we conservatives will continue to focus on making history.

Posted in War and Terror | Leave a Comment »

The Greatest Game Ever Played

Posted by Mark on October 17, 2005

The Greatest Game Ever Played: Harry Vardon, Francis Ouimet, and the Birth of Modern Golf

Look, I don’t play golf. Never have, probably never will. I suspect many of my readers don’t play either. But don’t let that stop you from reading this book, or seeing the movie for that matter. The accomplishments of Francis Ouimet, and Harry Vardon, for that matter, deserve to be known. You will find yourself cheering and crying at the same time throughout this book. And you’ll get a glimpse of life in the early 20th century that few history books could ever give.

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a Comment »

We Are Winning

Posted by Mark on October 17, 2005

This deserves to be read. And then read again. I’ve copied it completely, something I seldom do. Please read it, then go to the link to see who wrote it.
Why? Because I know for a stone cold fact that my friends on the left will immediately discount this editorial once they see the author. They do this at their own intellectual peril.

No better analysis has been done on the current Miers debate, or conservatism in general:

I love being a conservative. We conservatives are proud of our philosophy. Unlike our liberal friends, who are constantly looking for new words to conceal their true beliefs and are in a perpetual state of reinvention, we conservatives are unapologetic about our ideals. We are confident in our principles and energetic about openly advancing them. We believe in individual liberty, limited government, capitalism, the rule of law, faith, a color-blind society and national security. We support school choice, enterprise zones, tax cuts, welfare reform, faith-based initiatives, political speech, homeowner rights and the war on terrorism. And at our core we embrace and celebrate the most magnificent governing document ever ratified by any nation–the U.S. Constitution. Along with the Declaration of Independence, which recognizes our God-given natural right to be free, it is the foundation on which our government is built and has enabled us to flourish as a people.

We conservatives are never stronger than when we are advancing our principles. And that’s the nature of our current debate over the nomination of Harriet Miers. Will she respect the Constitution? Will she be an originalist who will accept the limited role of the judiciary to interpret and uphold it, and leave the elected branches–we, the people–to set public policy? Given the extraordinary power the Supreme Court has seized from the representative parts of our government, this is no small matter. Roe v. Wade is a primary example of judicial activism. Regardless of one’s position on abortion, seven unelected and unaccountable justices simply did not have the constitutional authority to impose their pro-abortion views on the nation. The Constitution empowers the people, through their elected representatives in Congress or the state legislatures, to make this decision.

Abortion is only one of countless areas in which a mere nine lawyers in robes have imposed their personal policy preferences on the rest of us. The court has conferred due process rights on terrorists detained at Guantanamo Bay and benefits on illegal immigrants. It has ruled that animated cyberspace child pornography is protected speech, but certain broadcast ads aired before elections are illegal; it has held that the Ten Commandments can’t be displayed in a public building, but they can be displayed outside a public building; and the court has invented rationales to skirt the Constitution, such as using foreign law to strike down juvenile death penalty statutes in over a dozen states.

For decades conservatives have considered judicial abuse a direct threat to our Constitution and our form of government. The framers didn’t create a judicial oligarchy. They created a representative republic. Our opposition to judicial activism runs deep. We’ve witnessed too many occasions where Republican presidents have nominated the wrong candidates to the court, and we want more assurances this time–some proof. The left, on the other hand, sees the courts as the only way to advance their big-government agenda. They can’t win national elections if they’re open about their agenda. So, they seek to impose their policies by judicial fiat. It’s time to call them on it. And that’s what many of us had hoped and expected when the president made his nomination.

Some liberal commentators mistakenly view the passionate debate among conservatives over the Miers nomination as a “crackup” on the right. They are giddy about “splits” in the conservative base of the GOP. They are predicting doom for the rest of the president’s term and gloom for Republican electoral chances in 2006. As usual, liberals don’t understand conservatives and never will.

The Miers nomination shows the strength of the conservative movement. This is no “crackup.” It’s a crackdown. We conservatives are unified in our objectives. And we are organized to advance them. The purpose of the Miers debate is to ensure that we are doing the very best we can to move the nation in the right direction. And when all is said and done, we will be even stronger and more focused on our agenda and defeating those who obstruct it, just in time for 2006 and 2008. Lest anyone forget, for several years before the 1980 election, we had knockdown battles within the GOP. The result: Ronald Reagan won two massive landslides.

The real crackup has already occurred–on the left! The Democratic Party has been hijacked by 1960s retreads like Howard Dean; billionaire eccentrics like George Soros; and leftwing computer geeks like Moveon.org. It nominated John Kerry, a notorious Vietnam-era antiwar activist, as its presidential standard-bearer. Its major spokesmen are old extremists like Ted Kennedy and new propagandists like Michael Moore. Its great presidential hope is one of the most divisive figures in U.S. politics, Hillary Clinton. And its favorite son is an impeached, disbarred, held-in-contempt ex-president, Bill Clinton. The Democratic Party today is split over the war and a host of cultural issues, such as same-sex marriage and partial birth abortion. It wants to raise taxes, but dares not say so. It can’t decide what message to convey to the American people or how to convey it. And even its once- reliable allies in the big media aren’t as influential in promoting the party and its agenda as they were in the past. The new media–talk radio, the Internet and cable TV–not only have a growing following, but have helped expose the bias and falsehoods of the big-media, e.g., Dan Rather, CBS News and the forged National Guard documents. Hence, circulation and audience is down, and dropping. The American left is stuck trying to repeat the history of its presumed glory years. They hope people will see Iraq as Vietnam, the entirety of the Bush administration as Watergate and Hurricane Katrina as the Great Depression. Beyond looking to the past for their salvation, the problem is that they continue to deceive even themselves. None of their comparisons are true. Meanwhile, we conservatives will continue to focus on making history.

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a Comment »