Liberty Just in Case

A Dialogue for the September 12th World

Archive for October, 2005

The Democrat Smear Campaign

Posted by Mark on October 31, 2005

I seldom say anything good about Chris Matthews, but he did a great public service today with this quote:

An obviously angry Matthews said, “I’m sitting here holding in my hands a pretty disgusting document. This is put out not for attribution, but it comes from the Democrats. They’re circulating it; I can say that. The first thing they nail about this Italian-American is he failed to win a mob conviction in a trial … way back in ’88. In other words, they nail him on not putting some Italian mobsters in jail from the family. Why would they bring up this ethnically charged issue as the first item they raise against Judge Alito?

“This is either a very bad coincidence or very bad politics,” he added, and warned Democrats that their sneak attack will backfire. “Either way it’s going to hurt them. … Not abortion rights, not civil rights but that he failed to nail some mobsters in 1988 — this is the top of their list of what they’ve got against this guy. Amazingly bad politics.”

The memo failed to note that Alito won a major prosecution against the Genovese crime family.

This fight has been coming for a long time. And the best part is that the Left will spend much of their time shooting themselves in the foot, among other places…:-)

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Filibustering is Looking Alot Less Likely

Posted by Mark on October 31, 2005

Both DeWine and Graham have said this will not be filibustered, period. Only a couple more from the Gang of Fourteen, and it can’t happen, period.

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This is True – October Edition

Posted by zaphriel on October 31, 2005

TOP OF THE NEWS: An unnamed newspaper carrier in Jacksonville, Fla., was confronted by a man who said the carrier had forgotten to deliver his newspaper. When the 56-year-old carrier asked the man for his address to check his list, the man responded by pulling a gun. “Give me a paper,” he demanded at gunpoint. The carrier handed over a paper, then called police. Officers found Christopher M. Cooper, 26, hiding in a cooler at a gas station, a gun in his car, and marijuana in his pocket. He was charged with armed robbery of the 50-cent paper, and drug possession. (Jacksonville Times-Union) …Actually, the more interesting edition of the paper was the next day’s, which contained this story.

DRIVEN: “He had no idea he had been involved in an accident,” said St. Petersburg, Fla., police officer Mike Jockers. But indeed Ralph Parker, 93, had hit a pedestrian on a busy street at about 45 mph. The 52-year- old man smashed half-way through Parker’s windshield — and stayed there as Parker kept driving. He drove, apparently unaware of the body, until he got to a bridge’s toll plaza, three miles away. The toll taker thought the body on the car was a Halloween prank until Parker stopped to pay the toll — and the body slid the rest of the way through the windshield. When police asked Parker where the dead body in his car came from, he said it must have “fallen out of the sky.” Police took Parker’s license from him (it doesn’t expire for five more years) and will ask the motor vehicle department to conduct a competency hearing toward revoking it permanently. (St. Petersburg Times) …One down, tens of thousands left to go.

DEAD MEAT: Diane Johnson, 74, of Ormond Beach, Fla., was pretty shocked by what she found in a pork loin she got at a local supermarket: a bullet. A spokesman for Publix grocery stores said the chain is perplexed: they scan their meat with a metal detector before it goes on the shelf. And he couldn’t explain how a bullet would get into grocery meat in the first place. But the store doesn’t have to brace for a lawsuit: “I don’t plan to sue anyone because no one got hurt,” Johnson said, noting she was quite satisfied with the $10 refund from the store — and a replacement roast. “I hope there’s no bullets in it,” she said. (AP) …No lawsuit? Well there you have it: Florida really IS a strange place!

PAY ATTENTION! Cliffton Hassam, 16, was in class at East Ridge High School in Clermont, Fla., when the little box on his belt started beeping. Substitute teacher Richard Maline demanded that Hassam hand it over, but Hassam refused. So Maline grabbed it and yanked. It wasn’t a cell phone or pager, as Maline apparently figured, but rather an insulin pump; the beeping was to alert Hassam, a diabetic, that his blood sugar was at a dangerous level. Hassam got the device back and hooked up before he suffered ill effects, and Maline was fired by the school. “When we train our substitutes, that’s one of the items we cover,” a school spokesman said. “We specifically train our substitutes on this particular device.” (Orlando Sentinel) …Yeah, but did you give him a quiz afterward to ensure he had met the “learning objectives”?

Copyright www.thisistrue.com

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Sam Alito: A Conservative Home Run!

Posted by Mark on October 31, 2005

Great choice. Wish he’d done it a week ago. Now the battle lines are drawn the way they should be, and conservatives are no longer in a circular firing squad. Yippee!

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Sam Alito: A Conservative Home Run!

Posted by Mark on October 31, 2005

Great choice. Wish he’d done it a week ago. Now the battle lines are drawn the way they should be, and conservatives are no longer in a circular firing squad. Yippee!

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a Comment »

The Waiting is Over: The Coming Battles

Posted by Mark on October 29, 2005

The National Review editorial today is worth reading, and mirrors my views on the Libby indictment. My post yesterday was written at noon. The National Review editorial at 6:20pm. :

There has been much high-minded talk about how the Valerie Plame controversy is really about the case for the Iraq war. No. For liberals, it has always been about inflicting as much damage as possible to the Bush White House, especially by taking out through indictment its most central player in the person of Karl Rove. That has not happened. Nor has special prosecutor Patrick Fitzgerald alleged a conspiracy at the top levels of the Bush administration to out a CIA agent. What he instead charges in his five-count indictment is that Vice President Dick Cheney’s chief of staff, Lewis “Scooter” Libby, lied to investigators about conversations with three reporters. This long-hyped, two-year investigation appears to come down, in other words, to one man’s alleged dishonesty when investigators came knocking. This is not Watergate or Iran-Contra, but neither is it a trifle.

And this:

Fitzgerald’s merits aside, the limits of special-prosecutor investigations were once again evident in this case. Two years later, we still don’t know important facts. Was Plame covert? Fitzgerald can’t or won’t say. Who is “Official A” (although we can all guess)? Who were the other unnamed officials? It is a prosecutor’s job to build a criminal case, period, full stop. But in high-stakes political controversies, that’s not really the public interest — disclosure is. Then, everyone knows the facts and the public can make its judgments on what is appropriate. Offending officials can be punished with resignations and public obloquy. Except in dire cases — say, bribery — that process should take precedence over prosecutions rather than the other way around.

OpinionJournal also has an editorial worth reading. The left will continue to wail about how this is about Iraq, yet Patrick Fitzgerald, in his somewhat long-winded press conference, clearly stated this case is NOT about Iraq,but about lying to the Grand Jury. I’m thinking the Left will selectively leave out that part of his statement.

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Tough History is Coming: Peggy Noonan

Posted by Mark on October 29, 2005

I’ve been reluctant to do much blogging lately, and couldn’t figure out why. I’ve been fighting a nasty sinus infection, and feeling generally blah. Reading other blogs left me with the impression others were suffering sinus infections too. Now I know different.

Truth is, I’ve been overwhelmed, and didn’t realize it until I read Peggy Noonan’s column this morning. Here’s the first paragraphs:

It is not so hard and can be a pleasure to tell people what you see. It’s harder to speak of what you think you see, what you think is going on and can’t prove or defend with data or numbers. That can get tricky. It involves hunches. But here goes.

I think there is an unspoken subtext in our national political culture right now. In fact I think it’s a subtext to our society. I think that a lot of people are carrying around in their heads, unarticulated and even in some cases unnoticed, a sense that the wheels are coming off the trolley and the trolley off the tracks. That in some deep and fundamental way things have broken down and can’t be fixed, or won’t be fixed any time soon. That our pollsters are preoccupied with “right track” and “wrong track” but missing the number of people who think the answer to “How are things going in America?” is “Off the tracks and hurtling forward, toward an unknown destination.”

I’m not talking about “Plamegate.” As I write no indictments have come up. I’m not talking about “Miers.” I mean . . . the whole ball of wax. Everything. Cloning, nuts with nukes, epidemics; the growing knowledge that there’s no such thing as homeland security; the fact that we’re leaving our kids with a bill no one can pay. A sense of unreality in our courts so deep that they think they can seize grandma’s house to build a strip mall; our media institutions imploding–the spectacle of a great American newspaper, the New York Times, hurtling off its own tracks, as did CBS. The fear of parents that their children will wind up disturbed, and their souls actually imperiled, by the popular culture in which we are raising them. Senators who seem owned by someone, actually owned, by an interest group or a financial entity. Great churches that have lost all sense of mission, and all authority. Do you have confidence in the CIA? The FBI? I didn’t think so.

But this recounting doesn’t quite get me to what I mean. I mean I believe there’s a general and amorphous sense that things are broken and tough history is coming.

Tough history is coming. And coming all at once. I haven’t been blogging because there have been too many stories, each of which appears urgent and requires deep thought, requires time. Too much, too fast. And none of them terribly important.

A long time ago, I read Charles Hummel’s wonderful booklet Tyrany of the Urgent. Separating what’s important from what is urgent, and understanding how the Urgent matters can crowd out the Important ones is always a challenge.

It’s something I’ve forgotten here at Liberty Just in Case. All the urgent stories, so eloquently listed by Peggy Noonan, have crowded out the Important stories, and left me so overwhelmed I simply didn’t want to do any blogging.

Liberty Just in Case began as a way to keep my co-workers informed and entertained by stories I found on the internet. I changed on 9/11, and so did LJiC. It became, as the description below the title says, “An ongoing dialogue about Politics, Culture, Religion and the Universe in general in a September 12th world.” It’s that last part, “a September 12th world” that is the guide to what is important at LJiC.

September 11th, 2001 marked the end of an era, and an end to a feeling of protection for me. It was the day this nation went to war. But, in a much more personal way, it was the day I went to war. Oh, I didn’t serve in the military. Too many health problems for that. But I took up the pen, or in this case the keyboard, to promote winning the war in any way I could. In the end, that’s the purpose of Liberty Just in Case, to promote the winning of World War IV. That’s what is important. Other news stories may be urgent, but in the end, winning the war was what brought this blog into being, and will continue to be the driving motivation of its continuance.

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The Waiting is Over: The Coming Battles

Posted by Mark on October 29, 2005

The National Review editorial today is worth reading, and mirrors my views on the Libby indictment. My post yesterday was written at noon. The National Review editorial at 6:20pm. :

There has been much high-minded talk about how the Valerie Plame controversy is really about the case for the Iraq war. No. For liberals, it has always been about inflicting as much damage as possible to the Bush White House, especially by taking out through indictment its most central player in the person of Karl Rove. That has not happened. Nor has special prosecutor Patrick Fitzgerald alleged a conspiracy at the top levels of the Bush administration to out a CIA agent. What he instead charges in his five-count indictment is that Vice President Dick Cheney�s chief of staff, Lewis �Scooter� Libby, lied to investigators about conversations with three reporters. This long-hyped, two-year investigation appears to come down, in other words, to one man’s alleged dishonesty when investigators came knocking. This is not Watergate or Iran-Contra, but neither is it a trifle.

And this:

Fitzgerald’s merits aside, the limits of special-prosecutor investigations were once again evident in this case. Two years later, we still don’t know important facts. Was Plame covert? Fitzgerald can’t or won’t say. Who is �Official A� (although we can all guess)? Who were the other unnamed officials? It is a prosecutor’s job to build a criminal case, period, full stop. But in high-stakes political controversies, that’s not really the public interest � disclosure is. Then, everyone knows the facts and the public can make its judgments on what is appropriate. Offending officials can be punished with resignations and public obloquy. Except in dire cases � say, bribery � that process should take precedence over prosecutions rather than the other way around.

OpinionJournal also has an editorial worth reading. The left will continue to wail about how this is about Iraq, yet Patrick Fitzgerald, in his somewhat long-winded press conference, clearly stated this case is NOT about Iraq,but about lying to the Grand Jury. I’m thinking the Left will selectively leave out that part of his statement.

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Tough History is Coming: Peggy Noonan

Posted by Mark on October 29, 2005

I’ve been reluctant to do much blogging lately, and couldn’t figure out why. I’ve been fighting a nasty sinus infection, and feeling generally blah. Reading other blogs left me with the impression others were suffering sinus infections too. Now I know different.

Truth is, I’ve been overwhelmed, and didn’t realize it until I read Peggy Noonan’s column this morning. Here’s the first paragraphs:

It is not so hard and can be a pleasure to tell people what you see. It’s harder to speak of what you think you see, what you think is going on and can’t prove or defend with data or numbers. That can get tricky. It involves hunches. But here goes.

I think there is an unspoken subtext in our national political culture right now. In fact I think it’s a subtext to our society. I think that a lot of people are carrying around in their heads, unarticulated and even in some cases unnoticed, a sense that the wheels are coming off the trolley and the trolley off the tracks. That in some deep and fundamental way things have broken down and can’t be fixed, or won’t be fixed any time soon. That our pollsters are preoccupied with “right track” and “wrong track” but missing the number of people who think the answer to “How are things going in America?” is “Off the tracks and hurtling forward, toward an unknown destination.”

I’m not talking about “Plamegate.” As I write no indictments have come up. I’m not talking about “Miers.” I mean . . . the whole ball of wax. Everything. Cloning, nuts with nukes, epidemics; the growing knowledge that there’s no such thing as homeland security; the fact that we’re leaving our kids with a bill no one can pay. A sense of unreality in our courts so deep that they think they can seize grandma’s house to build a strip mall; our media institutions imploding–the spectacle of a great American newspaper, the New York Times, hurtling off its own tracks, as did CBS. The fear of parents that their children will wind up disturbed, and their souls actually imperiled, by the popular culture in which we are raising them. Senators who seem owned by someone, actually owned, by an interest group or a financial entity. Great churches that have lost all sense of mission, and all authority. Do you have confidence in the CIA? The FBI? I didn’t think so.

But this recounting doesn’t quite get me to what I mean. I mean I believe there’s a general and amorphous sense that things are broken and tough history is coming.

Tough history is coming. And coming all at once. I haven’t been blogging because there have been too many stories, each of which appears urgent and requires deep thought, requires time. Too much, too fast. And none of them terribly important.

A long time ago, I read Charles Hummel’s wonderful booklet Tyrany of the Urgent. Separating what’s important from what is urgent, and understanding how the Urgent matters can crowd out the Important ones is always a challenge.

It’s something I’ve forgotten here at Liberty Just in Case. All the urgent stories, so eloquently listed by Peggy Noonan, have crowded out the Important stories, and left me so overwhelmed I simply didn’t want to do any blogging.

Liberty Just in Case began as a way to keep my co-workers informed and entertained by stories I found on the internet. I changed on 9/11, and so did LJiC. It became, as the description below the title says, “An ongoing dialogue about Politics, Culture, Religion and the Universe in general in a September 12th world.” It’s that last part, “a September 12th world” that is the guide to what is important at LJiC.

September 11th, 2001 marked the end of an era, and an end to a feeling of protection for me. It was the day this nation went to war. But, in a much more personal way, it was the day I went to war. Oh, I didn’t serve in the military. Too many health problems for that. But I took up the pen, or in this case the keyboard, to promote winning the war in any way I could. In the end, that’s the purpose of Liberty Just in Case, to promote the winning of World War IV. That’s what is important. Other news stories may be urgent, but in the end, winning the war was what brought this blog into being, and will continue to be the driving motivation of its continuance.

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Two Years, and THIS is it?

Posted by Mark on October 28, 2005

So, Lewis Libby couldn’t keep his stories straight, and may have lied to the Grand Jury. That most assuredly deserves conviction if true. But that’s a far cry from the caterwauling from the mainstream media for the past several days. No charges related to the “outing” of a CIA agent, no charges at all against Karl Rove. The Bush administration will go on.

Now, here are my questions:
Who was Bob Novak’s source?
Was Valerie Plame really a covert agent, and what exactly was her influence over the decision to send her husband Joseph Wilson to Niger.
What crime was actually committed here, and by whom?

Over the coming days, we will see more and more hysterics from the Left, both in the MSM, and perhaps more importantly, in the blogosphere. Those on the left who are honest know that their early Christmas was a bust. They’ll try to make more out of this than is there, and will fail, again.

Meanwhile, those same bloggers and MSM journalists trying to make the best of these indictments were the same ones defending Clinton to the hilt. And what did the then POTUS do? Not only lied to a grand jury, but carefully and maliciously helped his girlfriend Monica Lewinsky write a false affadavit, therefore suborning perjury. Lost his law license for that, remember?

If Libby screwed up and lied, let the conviction happen. Perjury and Obstruction of Justice matter. They mattered in 1998, and they matter now. But the ones doing the Snoopy dance now are the same ones who defended Clinton then. Hypocisy? Political agendas? Yep.

One interesting paragraph at the end of the press release:

The public is reminded that an indictment contains only charges and is not evidence of guilt. The defendant is presumed innocent and is entitled to a fair trial at which the government has the burden of proving guilt beyond a reasonable doubt.

You think Chris Matthews will get to that part? Not likely.

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