Liberty Just in Case

A Dialogue for the September 12th World

Archive for September 7th, 2005

Who’s to Blame? New Gallup Poll

Posted by Mark on September 7, 2005

Only the usual 13% blame President Bush. That’s about the right number. So why is the MSM so hell bent on making us believe we all believe Bush is at fault for Katrina? Agenda, anyone?

No Apparent Outrage With Government’s Response to Hurricane

Despite widespread criticism of the response by Bush and, separately, the federal government, to the problems caused by the hurricane, the public seems on balance only mildly critical. Forty-two percent say Bush did a “bad” (18%) or “terrible” (24%) job, but 35% rate his response as either “great” (10%) or “good” (25%).

Do you think — [RANDOM ORDER] — has/have done a — great, good, neither good nor bad, bad, or terrible job — in responding to the hurricane and subsequent flooding?

Great

Good

Neither
good
nor
bad

Bad

Ter-
rible

No
opinion

%

%

%

%

%

%

George W. Bush

10

25

21

18

24

2

Federal government agencies responsible for handling emergencies

8

27

20

20

22

3

State and local officials in Louisiana

7

30

23

20

15

5

Federal agencies received a similar rating, with 42% of Americans giving a low rating and 35% a high one. The public was about evenly divided on state and local officials in Louisiana — 37% giving a high rating and 35% a low one.

The ratings for Bush are highly related to party affiliation.

  • By a margin of 69% to 10%, Republicans give Bush a positive rather than negative rating for his response.
  • Democrats give almost a mirror opposite — 66% negative to 10% positive.
  • Independents side with the Democrats, giving a more modest margin — 47% negative to 29% positive.

When asked to identify who was most responsible for the problems in New Orleans after the hurricane, 38% of Americans said no one was really to blame, while 13% cited Bush, 18% the federal agencies, and 25% state and local officials.

Who do you think is MOST responsible for the problems in New Orleans after the hurricane — [ROTATED: George W. Bush, federal agencies, (or) state and local officials], or is no one really to blame?

George W.
Bush

Federal
agencies

State/
local
officials

No one
to blame

No
opinion

2005 Sep 5-6

13%

18

25

38

6

Few Americans feel that any top official in the agencies responsible for handling emergencies should be dismissed from office — just 29% say someone should be fired, while 63% disagree.

Do you think that any of the top officials in the federal agencies responsible for handling emergencies should be fired, or don’t you think so?

Yes, should
be fired

No, don’t
think so

No
opinion

2005 Sep 5-6

29%

63

8

The Left’s onslaught against the President appears to have failed. But they’ll keep trying…

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A Tale of Two Cities: New Orleans and Houston

Posted by Mark on September 7, 2005

Great study in contrast between the two cities. Worth considering.

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Busy…Not a sufficient word…

Posted by zaphriel on September 7, 2005

Sorry for the lag in posting all, I have been away. Where do you ask, well a short notice trip to Texas. Why, well the Federal Government, who is soooo slow to react (sarcasm intended) needed to survey the damage of hurricane Katrina, and land troops from my unit to help with the security and medical situations down there. Quick trip for me with lots of follow up possible, so I apologize for going unexpectedly dark. But there are others in my community, and in the circle of bloggers I hang around with that are doing much more.
Like: …

Ben Kieckhefer
RENO GAZETTE-JOURNAL
Unsure of who they are, what state they call home or when they’ll arrive, Northern Nevada officials Tuesday prepared to receive 300 people evacuated from the Gulf Coast region devastated by Hurricane Katrina. …

And: …

September 7th, 2005 – Posted By Gribbit
The Stop The ACLU BlogBurst (link withheld intentionally) has members of many professional backgrounds. One of which is a nurse. Kathy from Is It Just Me and Crosses aCross America is hard at work vaccinating evacuated people from the flooding and destruction of Hurricane Katrina. She is doing so as a Red Cross Volunteer in Oklahoma.

After which, she is then going on to her regular job tending to the sick on 12 hour shifts. Please keep Kathy and the people in her care in your prayers. …

Gribbit is a contributing writer at Stop The ACLU and the co-founder and administrator of Stop The ACLU BlogBurst.

I will repeat Gribbit’s request and add my own… Please pull together, and don’t complain, but rather do something, anything, to help, if you have the means, please consider giving to the American Red Cross, the Salvation Army, or Feed The Children. If the opportunity exists, open up your home, there can be no greater gift. This did not just happen to the Gulf states, this happened to us all, please put aside partisanship for a while, and help.

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The Plan

Posted by Mark on September 7, 2005

Page 13, paragraph 5 seems to fit, don’t you think. I’m still thinking of those buses standing in water up to the windows that could have been used to get people to safety, and, apparently, were supposed to be.

Posted in War and Terror | Leave a Comment »

And a Child Shall Lead Them

Posted by Mark on September 7, 2005

Darn. My fingers are slipping off the keys from the tears again. Just read the story, will ‘ya?

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This Isn’t the ’70’s

Posted by Mark on September 7, 2005

Gas prices appear to have hit their high, and are on their way down. Wonder why this isn’t being covered by the MSM? Maybe because it’s good news for a change:

The story of Hurricane Katrina is first and foremost a tale of the wrath of Mother Nature and the resulting human misery: thousands of deaths, destroyed homes and businesses, family break-ups, psychological demoralization, and other hardships too painful to recount. But Katrina is also an economic story in terms of its impact on U.S. commerce, trade, energy, shipping, and overall growth. Here the doomsayers and pessimists are once again going to be proven wrong. This is not the 1970s.

Thanks Larry. I needed that. And this:

In fact, the economy going into the Katrina shock is very healthy. Last week we had another strong jobs report, with unemployment declining to 4.9 percent. Employment in the U.S. stands at a record 134 million business payrolls and 142 million people working. Unlike the 1970s, when real profits were declining, American business today is highly profitable, registering huge productivity gains with enormous cash on hand. That’s why stock prices actually increased during the Katrina breakout, a market signal of confidence in the economy’s future outlook.

And most of all, this:

In a week’s time, the Louisiana Offshore Oil Port moved back to 75 percent capacity, as did the Colonial pipeline. Shell’s Capline system and the Plantation pipeline are almost back to capacity. These are remarkable achievements. Our energy companies should be praised by the public, not sullied by cheap-shot politicians. Widely predicted gas shortages never materialized during one of the biggest driving weekends of the year…

Transportation in the Gulf Coast will be rerouted to Jacksonville, Florida, and points north. Energy slack will be picked up by Houston. Shipping and trade will swing over to the Port of Miami. Think market resiliency and flexibility coupled with economic incentives, and glued together by our remarkable information- and communications-technology systems. Even a temporary $100 billion economic loss will not stop American free enterprise from moving forward.

It’s all we can hope for and more. Perhaps our economic success will help relieve the demoralization and misery left in Mother Nature’s wake. But one thing is for sure: Ours is a wealth-creating, opportunity-opening economy that does not teeter on the edge of destruction. We will move to new higher ground before long.

Doom and gloom gets the ratings,but optimism, and free market ecomomies keep America moving, as long as the left can stay out of the way.



Posted in War and Terror | Leave a Comment »

The Plan

Posted by Mark on September 7, 2005

Page 13, paragraph 5 seems to fit, don’t you think. I’m still thinking of those buses standing in water up to the windows that could have been used to get people to safety, and, apparently, were supposed to be.

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a Comment »

An Amazing Weekend in The Blogosphere

Posted by Mark on September 7, 2005

Final totals for the Katrina Relief Fund Drive were well over a million dollars. Not bad for a bunch folks sitting around in their pajamas typing on their tear stained keyboards.

Posted in War and Terror | Leave a Comment »

And a Child Shall Lead Them

Posted by Mark on September 7, 2005

Darn. My fingers are slipping off the keys from the tears again. Just read the story, will ‘ya?

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a Comment »

This Isn’t the ’70’s

Posted by Mark on September 7, 2005

Gas prices appear to have hit their high, and are on their way down. Wonder why this isn’t being covered by the MSM? Maybe because it’s good news for a change:

The story of Hurricane Katrina is first and foremost a tale of the wrath of Mother Nature and the resulting human misery: thousands of deaths, destroyed homes and businesses, family break-ups, psychological demoralization, and other hardships too painful to recount. But Katrina is also an economic story in terms of its impact on U.S. commerce, trade, energy, shipping, and overall growth. Here the doomsayers and pessimists are once again going to be proven wrong. This is not the 1970s.

Thanks Larry. I needed that. And this:

In fact, the economy going into the Katrina shock is very healthy. Last week we had another strong jobs report, with unemployment declining to 4.9 percent. Employment in the U.S. stands at a record 134 million business payrolls and 142 million people working. Unlike the 1970s, when real profits were declining, American business today is highly profitable, registering huge productivity gains with enormous cash on hand. That�s why stock prices actually increased during the Katrina breakout, a market signal of confidence in the economy�s future outlook.

And most of all, this:

In a week�s time, the Louisiana Offshore Oil Port moved back to 75 percent capacity, as did the Colonial pipeline. Shell�s Capline system and the Plantation pipeline are almost back to capacity. These are remarkable achievements. Our energy companies should be praised by the public, not sullied by cheap-shot politicians. Widely predicted gas shortages never materialized during one of the biggest driving weekends of the year…

Transportation in the Gulf Coast will be rerouted to Jacksonville, Florida, and points north. Energy slack will be picked up by Houston. Shipping and trade will swing over to the Port of Miami. Think market resiliency and flexibility coupled with economic incentives, and glued together by our remarkable information- and communications-technology systems. Even a temporary $100 billion economic loss will not stop American free enterprise from moving forward.

It�s all we can hope for and more. Perhaps our economic success will help relieve the demoralization and misery left in Mother Nature�s wake. But one thing is for sure: Ours is a wealth-creating, opportunity-opening economy that does not teeter on the edge of destruction. We will move to new higher ground before long.

Doom and gloom gets the ratings,but optimism, and free market ecomomies keep America moving, as long as the left can stay out of the way.

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a Comment »