Liberty Just in Case

A Dialogue for the September 12th World

Archive for June 7th, 2005

Moral Freefall: The Gun-Toting Liberal

Posted by Mark on June 7, 2005

So, here I am, posting all these intellectual guys making money off their writing, and GT’s post was just waiting to have the last word. Oh, are some of you gonna hate this….:-)

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Moral Freefall: Just One More From OpinionJournal

Posted by Mark on June 7, 2005

One of those poor innocents about which Amnesty International shows concern:

But before leaving this episode, we’d like to remind readers of the case of Ahmed Hikmat Shakir. On November 19, 2001, Amnesty issued one of its “URGENT ACTION” reports on his behalf: “Amnesty International is concerned for the safety of Iraqi citizen Ahmad Hikmat Shakir, who is being held by the Jordanian General Intelligence Department. . . . He is held incommunicado detention and is at risk of torture or ill-treatment.” Pressure from Amnesty and Saddam Hussein’s Iraq worked; Mr. Shakir was released and hasn’t been seen since.

Mr. Shakir is believed to be an al Qaeda operative who abetted the USS Cole bombing and 9/11 plots, among others. Along with 9/11 hijackers Khalid al Midhar and Nawaf al Hazmi, he was present at the January 2000 al Qaeda summit in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. He was working there as an airport “greeter”–a job obtained for him by the Iraqi embassy. When he was arrested in Qatar not long after 9/11, he had telephone numbers for the safe houses of the 1993 World Trade Center bombers. He was inexplicably released by the Qataris and promptly arrested again in Jordan as he attempted to return to Iraq.

There remains a dispute about whether this is the same Ahmed Hikmat Shakir that records discovered after the Iraq w

ar list as a Lieutenant Colonel in the Saddam Fedayeen–the 9/11 Commission believes these are two different people–and whether Mr. Shakir thus represents an Iraqi government connection to 9/11. But there is no doubt that the Hussein regime, whatever its reasons, was eager to have the al Qaeda Shakir return to Iraq. It was aided and abetted to this end by Amnesty International.

We don’t recount this story to suggest Amnesty was actively in league with Saddam. But it shows that, even after 9/11, Amnesty still didn’t think terrorism was a big deal. In its eagerness to suggest that every detainee with a Muslim name is some kind of political prisoner, and by extension to smear America and its allies, Amnesty has given the concept of “aid and comfort” to the enemy an all-too-literal meaning.

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Election 2006: Katherine Harris For Senate

Posted by Mark on June 7, 2005

2006 looks to be almost as much fun as 2004 for political junkies. Not that I would know…Gotta go… C-Span II is showing the Senate Debate on which wallpaper would look best in the Senate Dining Room. Can’t miss that!

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The Nine Planets

Posted by Mark on June 7, 2005

Few sites better for an overall look at our Solar System. Great photographs, and updated regularly.

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Moral Freefall: Just One More From OpinionJournal

Posted by Mark on June 7, 2005

One of those poor innocents about which Amnesty International shows concern:

But before leaving this episode, we’d like to remind readers of the case of Ahmed Hikmat Shakir. On November 19, 2001, Amnesty issued one of its “URGENT ACTION” reports on his behalf: “Amnesty International is concerned for the safety of Iraqi citizen Ahmad Hikmat Shakir, who is being held by the Jordanian General Intelligence Department. . . . He is held incommunicado detention and is at risk of torture or ill-treatment.” Pressure from Amnesty and Saddam Hussein’s Iraq worked; Mr. Shakir was released and hasn’t been seen since.

Mr. Shakir is believed to be an al Qaeda operative who abetted the USS Cole bombing and 9/11 plots, among others. Along with 9/11 hijackers Khalid al Midhar and Nawaf al Hazmi, he was present at the January 2000 al Qaeda summit in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. He was working there as an airport “greeter”–a job obtained for him by the Iraqi embassy. When he was arrested in Qatar not long after 9/11, he had telephone numbers for the safe houses of the 1993 World Trade Center bombers. He was inexplicably released by the Qataris and promptly arrested again in Jordan as he attempted to return to Iraq.

There remains a dispute about whether this is the same Ahmed Hikmat Shakir that records discovered after the Iraq w

ar list as a Lieutenant Colonel in the Saddam Fedayeen–the 9/11 Commission believes these are two different people–and whether Mr. Shakir thus represents an Iraqi government connection to 9/11. But there is no doubt that the Hussein regime, whatever its reasons, was eager to have the al Qaeda Shakir return to Iraq. It was aided and abetted to this end by Amnesty International.

We don’t recount this story to suggest Amnesty was actively in league with Saddam. But it shows that, even after 9/11, Amnesty still didn’t think terrorism was a big deal. In its eagerness to suggest that every detainee with a Muslim name is some kind of political prisoner, and by extension to smear America and its allies, Amnesty has given the concept of “aid and comfort” to the enemy an all-too-literal meaning.

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Election 2006: Katherine Harris For Senate

Posted by Mark on June 7, 2005

2006 looks to be almost as much fun as 2004 for political junkies. Not that I would know…Gotta go… C-Span II is showing the Senate Debate on which wallpaper would look best in the Senate Dining Room. Can’t miss that!

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Hellooooo!!!!! Is ANYONE in Hollywood Listening?!?!?

Posted by Mark on June 7, 2005

This is great news!

The new, expanded study examines the revenue and production costs for 3,000 Motion Picture Assn. of America-rated theatrical films released between Jan. 1, 1989, and Dec. 31, 2003, using the 200 most widely distributed films each year based on the number of theaters.

“While the movie industry produced nearly 12 times more R-rated films than G-rated films from 1989-2003, the average G-rated film produced 11 times greater profit than its R-rated counterpart,” said Dick Rolfe, the group’s founder and chairman.
So why did Reuters feel compelled to include this at the beginning?:

The survey was commissioned by the Dove Foundation, a Grand Rapids, Mich.-based group that advocates wholesome family entertainment. According to its Web site, its advisory board includes radio talk show host Laura Schlessinger and “Touched By an Angel” executive producer Martha Williamson.

At least they didn’t use the word “conservative” in the paragraph.


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The Amnesty and the Gulag

Posted by zaphriel on June 7, 2005

Boy, Mark sure does do his research, if only I had the time. I wish I had something profound to add, nut I don’t, I can’t say it any better than he did. This whole thing just pains me, especially when by talking about this, we on the right get accused of liking / wanting more torture and not caring for human rights, when just the opposite is true.

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The Nine Planets

Posted by Mark on June 7, 2005

Few sites better for an overall look at our Solar System. Great photographs, and updated regularly.

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Moral Freefall: Amnesty International

Posted by Mark on June 7, 2005

Three must read editorials on Amnesty International. Below are small excerpts. Please read them completely before commenting:

Kenneth Anderson:

We also know that it is suicidally irresponsible for groups that depend on the moral force of their pronouncements to habitually say things they don’t actually mean. Rhetorical inflation is a dangerous indulgence for the human rights movement. And it is a bad thing for the cause of human rights.

Dennis Prager:

That devolution was most apparent years ago when Amnesty International listed the United States as a major violator of human rights because it executed murderers. The organization’s inability to morally distinguish between executing murderers and executing innocent people means that Amnesty International is worse than ineffectual; the good it has done notwithstanding, it is becoming harmful to the cause of human rights.

His statistical comparison between Gitmo and the Gulags is worth a read all its own.

And speaking of comparisons,
David Limbaugh:

If the Left could bring itself to take a hiatus from its hyperbole in redefining “torture” so as conveniently to encompass the detention practices of the U.S. military in Guantanamo and elsewhere, perhaps it could rediscover the true meaning of torture by perusing the pages of Solzhenitsyn’s gripping account.

If they want to understand what real torture-minded interrogators have been known to do, they could begin with the chapter on “The Interrogation.” The chapter begins, “If the intellectuals in the plays of Chekhov who spent all their time guessing what would happen in 20, 30, or 40 years had been told that in 40 years interrogation by torture would be practiced in Russia; that prisoners would have their skulls squeezed within iron rings; that a human being would be lowered into an acid bath; that they would be trussed up naked to be bitten by ants and bedbugs; that a ramrod heated over a primus stove would be thrust up their anal canal (the ‘secret brand’); that a man’s genitals would be slowly crushed beneath the toe of a jackboot; and that, in the luckiest possible circumstances, prisoners would be tortured by being kept from sleeping for a week, by thirst, and by being beaten to a bloody pulp, not one of Chekhov’s plays would have gotten to its end because all the heroes would have gone off to insane asylums.”

Nor were these isolated, extreme, or extraordinary events being practiced “by one scoundrel alone in one secret place only, but by tens of thousands of specially trained human beasts standing over millions of defenseless victims.”

Oh, yes, and lest we forget, the interrogators of the Soviet camps were not trying to extract information from their subjects for such laudatory purposes as preventing the further slaughter of innocent human beings such as the victims of the Sept. 11 massacres. “Throughout the years and decades, interrogations under Article 58 were almost never undertaken to elicit the truth, but were simply an exercise in an inevitably filthy procedure: Someone who had been free only a little while before, who was sometimes proud and always unprepared, was to be bent and pushed through a narrow pipe where his sides would be torn by iron hooks and where he could not breathe, so that he would finally pray to get to the other end. And at the other end, he would be shoved out, an already processed native of the Archipelago, already in the promised land. (The fool would keep on resisting! He even thought there was a way back out of the pipe.)”

The left’s hysteria trivializes the true evil of places like the Gulag. It reveals an ignorance of the history of the Evil Empire, and evil in general. It also accuses both the current administration, and individual soldiers of horrendous evil without evidence in order to fulfill their own agenda.

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