Liberty Just in Case

A Dialogue for the September 12th World

Archive for June 1st, 2005

Another Rejection of the EU Constitution

Posted by Mark on June 1, 2005

My hope for Europe has just gone up another notch.

Posted in War and Terror | Leave a Comment »

The Quagmire of Fallujah

Posted by Mark on June 1, 2005

Quagmire is acquiring a new meaning. It used to mean “to be bogged down, as in quicksand, slowly sinking until dead.” Exhibit A for the Left has, and apparently always will be, Vietnam.

But after all the left’s use of the word, quagmire has come to mean any military campaign that, while initially difficult, becomes a success over time. One more required peice of the definition appears to be that while the going is difficult, the media must covers it obsessively, but the story must be covered less and less as the successes mount.

By this new definition, Fallujah stands as exhibit A of the word Quagmire.

Posted in War and Terror | Leave a Comment »

The Legacy of Watergate

Posted by Mark on June 1, 2005

Ben Stein’s column will provide a great psych test:

If you find yourself nodding your head as you read it, wishing you had written it, you can have a seat on the right side of the aisle. If you have developed a cramp in your neck from nodding so much, and find yourself cheering yourself hoarse that someone has finally told the truth, go lay down in the beds provided at the far right of the aisle, and avail yourself freely of the tranquilizers provided there.

If on the other hand, you find yourself shaking your head, and getting more angry the more you read, have a seat on the left side of the aisle. If you find yourself so angry you can’t stop your heart from racing, find your blood pressure rising, and wishing someone would stop these lies, please be at rest in the beds conveniently placed on the far left of the aisle, and avail yourself of the conveniently placed psychotropics. You may quietly mingle with others who suffer with neck problems and no voices. You will find you have much in common…

I’m one of the head nodders. No cramps, but definitely nodding my head. I have no illusions about the lies told by Nixon and his men, anymore than I have illusions about Clinton and his minions. I see the two as similar in some ways, like two sides of the same coin. They represent the currency of corruption. Their motives may have been different, but in the end, their corruption was similar. Yet their legacies are vastly different, as Stein makes clear:

That is his legacy. He was a peacemaker. He was a lying, conniving, covering up peacemaker. He was not a lying, conniving drug addict like JFK, a lying, conniving war starter like LBJ, a lying conniving seducer like Clinton — a lying conniving peacemaker. That is Nixon’s kharma.

When his enemies brought him down, and they had been laying for him since he proved that Alger Hiss was a traitor, since Alger Hiss was their fair-haired boy, this is what they bought for themselves in the Kharma Supermarket that is life:

1.) The defeat of the South Vietnamese government with decades of death and hardship for the people of Vietnam.

2.) The assumption of power in Cambodia by the bloodiest government of all time, the Khmer Rouge, who killed a third of their own people, often by making children beat their own parents to death. No one doubts RN would never have let this happen.

So, this is the great boast of the enemies of Richard Nixon, including Mark Felt: they made the conditions necessary for the Cambodian genocide. If there is such a thing as kharma, if there is such a thing as justice in this life of the next, Mark Felt has bought himself the worst future of any man on this earth. And Bob Woodward is right behind him, with Ben Bradlee bringing up the rear. Out of their smug arrogance and contempt, they hatched the worst nightmare imaginable: genocide. I hope they are happy now — because their future looks pretty bleak to me.

No President more fully represented the worst of the Baby Boomers who grew up in the Vietnam era than Clinton. Nixon and Clinton represent bookends on a chapter of American History we would do well not to repeat. And those on the left may not realize it, but their defense of Clinton’s lies puts the lie to their cheers at the fall of Richard M. Nixon.

Posted in War and Terror | Leave a Comment »

Deep Throat, Deeper Yawn

Posted by Mark on June 1, 2005

When I first heard the story yesterday, I said, “Huh, that’s interesting.” then went on with my life. Then I heard the story again a few minutes later. Then CNN went wall-to-wall. Then MSNBC did the same thing.

I know, I know. I’m supposed to be awestruck that Mark Felt (gasp!) is Deep Throat. At the top and bottom of each hour throughout the night, and on through today, I’ve heard the earth-shattering news, again and again. The Washington Post (Be still my heart!) confirms it!!!! We (gasp!) KNOW (gasp!) who Deep Throat was! (gasp! pant! gasp!) Frankly, I think the MSM needs an asthma treatment.

History is one of my favorite hobbies, as anyone who has read Liberty for any length of time can attest. The finding of thousands of ancient greek scrolls, the face of King Tut and the question of rather Lincoln was gay have been prominent posts here. So why isn’t this story making me do the backflips I’m seeing among the journalists
reporting this story?

I think part of the answer lies here:

But more than solving a legendary Washington riddle, Felt’s admission also breathed some much-needed life into the dying support for anonymous sources, which seems to have crippled journalistic credibility in many areas. From WMDs to the Valerie Plame case to Newsweek’s recent stumble, confidential sourcing is a much battered journalistic tool.

A legendary Washington riddle. Yep. It was legend in Washington, alright. But, except for a movie decades ago, the rest of the country really didn’t care much. But the right and left coasts sure did.

But the bigger reason for the media frenzy lies in the rest of the paragraph. Mainstream Journalism has been under attack by the bloggers for the past 2 years, finally bringing anonymous sourcing into the light of day. And now the media can breathe a huge sigh of relief, as their most successful example of anonymous sourcing can be brought forward. It doesn’t change the shoddy journalism that the bloggers have brought to light. But it gives the liberal media a chance to stand tall for a minute or two, and remember their mythology of bringing down a President.

So, what did journalism’s hunt for Nixon really do? The answer lies in the Ben Stein’s column in the next post.

Posted in War and Terror | Leave a Comment »

Something Fun…

Posted by zaphriel on June 1, 2005

With allof the discussion around the blogosphere about religion lately, I thought you might like to have some fun with it.
Try the Church Sign Generator

And tell me what you think.
Z.

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a Comment »

Another Rejection of the EU Constitution

Posted by Mark on June 1, 2005

My hope for Europe has just gone up another notch.

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a Comment »

The Quagmire of Fallujah

Posted by Mark on June 1, 2005

Quagmire is acquiring a new meaning. It used to mean “to be bogged down, as in quicksand, slowly sinking until dead.” Exhibit A for the Left has, and apparently always will be, Vietnam.

But after all the left’s use of the word, quagmire has come to mean any military campaign that, while initially difficult, becomes a success over time. One more required peice of the definition appears to be that while the going is difficult, the media must covers it obsessively, but the story must be covered less and less as the successes mount.

By this new definition, Fallujah stands as exhibit A of the word Quagmire.

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a Comment »

The Legacy of Watergate

Posted by Mark on June 1, 2005

Ben Stein’s column will provide a great psych test:

If you find yourself nodding your head as you read it, wishing you had written it, you can have a seat on the right side of the aisle. If you have developed a cramp in your neck from nodding so much, and find yourself cheering yourself hoarse that someone has finally told the truth, go lay down in the beds provided at the far right of the aisle, and avail yourself freely of the tranquilizers provided there.

If on the other hand, you find yourself shaking your head, and getting more angry the more you read, have a seat on the left side of the aisle. If you find yourself so angry you can’t stop your heart from racing, find your blood pressure rising, and wishing someone would stop these lies, please be at rest in the beds conveniently placed on the far left of the aisle, and avail yourself of the conveniently placed psychotropics. You may quietly mingle with others who suffer with neck problems and no voices. You will find you have much in common…

I’m one of the head nodders. No cramps, but definitely nodding my head. I have no illusions about the lies told by Nixon and his men, anymore than I have illusions about Clinton and his minions. I see the two as similar in some ways, like two sides of the same coin. They represent the currency of corruption. Their motives may have been different, but in the end, their corruption was similar. Yet their legacies are vastly different, as Stein makes clear:

That is his legacy. He was a peacemaker. He was a lying, conniving, covering up peacemaker. He was not a lying, conniving drug addict like JFK, a lying, conniving war starter like LBJ, a lying conniving seducer like Clinton — a lying conniving peacemaker. That is Nixon’s kharma.

When his enemies brought him down, and they had been laying for him since he proved that Alger Hiss was a traitor, since Alger Hiss was their fair-haired boy, this is what they bought for themselves in the Kharma Supermarket that is life:

1.) The defeat of the South Vietnamese government with decades of death and hardship for the people of Vietnam.

2.) The assumption of power in Cambodia by the bloodiest government of all time, the Khmer Rouge, who killed a third of their own people, often by making children beat their own parents to death. No one doubts RN would never have let this happen.

So, this is the great boast of the enemies of Richard Nixon, including Mark Felt: they made the conditions necessary for the Cambodian genocide. If there is such a thing as kharma, if there is such a thing as justice in this life of the next, Mark Felt has bought himself the worst future of any man on this earth. And Bob Woodward is right behind him, with Ben Bradlee bringing up the rear. Out of their smug arrogance and contempt, they hatched the worst nightmare imaginable: genocide. I hope they are happy now — because their future looks pretty bleak to me.

No President more fully represented the worst of the Baby Boomers who grew up in the Vietnam era than Clinton. Nixon and Clinton represent bookends on a chapter of American History we would do well not to repeat. And those on the left may not realize it, but their defense of Clinton’s lies puts the lie to their cheers at the fall of Richard M. Nixon.

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a Comment »

Deep Throat, Deeper Yawn

Posted by Mark on June 1, 2005

When I first heard the story yesterday, I said, “Huh, that’s interesting.” then went on with my life. Then I heard the story again a few minutes later. Then CNN went wall-to-wall. Then MSNBC did the same thing.

I know, I know. I’m supposed to be awestruck that Mark Felt (gasp!) is Deep Throat. At the top and bottom of each hour throughout the night, and on through today, I’ve heard the earth-shattering news, again and again. The Washington Post (Be still my heart!) confirms it!!!! We (gasp!) KNOW (gasp!) who Deep Throat was! (gasp! pant! gasp!) Frankly, I think the MSM needs an asthma treatment.

History is one of my favorite hobbies, as anyone who has read Liberty for any length of time can attest. The finding of thousands of ancient greek scrolls, the face of King Tut and the question of rather Lincoln was gay have been prominent posts here. So why isn’t this story making me do the backflips I’m seeing among the journalists
reporting this story?

I think part of the answer lies here:

But more than solving a legendary Washington riddle, Felt’s admission also breathed some much-needed life into the dying support for anonymous sources, which seems to have crippled journalistic credibility in many areas. From WMDs to the Valerie Plame case to Newsweek’s recent stumble, confidential sourcing is a much battered journalistic tool.

A legendary Washington riddle. Yep. It was legend in Washington, alright. But, except for a movie decades ago, the rest of the country really didn’t care much. But the right and left coasts sure did.

But the bigger reason for the media frenzy lies in the rest of the paragraph. Mainstream Journalism has been under attack by the bloggers for the past 2 years, finally bringing anonymous sourcing into the light of day. And now the media can breathe a huge sigh of relief, as their most successful example of anonymous sourcing can be brought forward. It doesn’t change the shoddy journalism that the bloggers have brought to light. But it gives the liberal media a chance to stand tall for a minute or two, and remember their mythology of bringing down a President.

So, what did journalism’s hunt for Nixon really do? The answer lies in the Ben Stein’s column in the next post.

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a Comment »