Liberty Just in Case

A Dialogue for the September 12th World

Archive for May 7th, 2005

A Letter From Dick Durbin

Posted by Mark on May 7, 2005

Wow! What an honor! A form letter from one of my two senators from Illinois. It starts with the lie that he appreciates hearing from me, and ends with the lie that he will keep my views in mind in voting for Judicial Nominees. Everything in between is just Democratic talking points. I’d write him back, but his next form letter would have a hard time getting past my spam filters.

But, if I’m ever in Washington at 8:30 AM on a Thursday, you can just bet I’ll stop in for Coffee and Donuts so he and Senator Obama can hear what’s on the mind of this particular Illinoisan…yessiree, I’ve got a thing or two on my mind to tell my Senators from The People’s Republic of Illinois…much of it relatively profanity free.

May 3, 2005

Dear Mr. :

Thank you for contacting me about President Bush’s judicial nominees. I
appreciate hearing from you.

I have voted to approve more than 90% of President Bush’s district and
circuit court nominees. The vast majority of his judicial nominees – more
than 200 of them – have been confirmed by the Senate.

As a member of the Senate Judiciary Committee, I carefully review the
merits of each nominee. During this process, I evaluate the nominee’s
past record, professional competence, integrity, temperament, and judicial
philosophy; his or her commitment to upholding the rights and protections
established by the Constitution, the Bill of Rights, and subsequent laws;
and the background information and testimony collected in the course of
the candidate’s confirmation hearings.

Throughout its history, the Senate has encouraged thorough debate on
important matters. Senate Rule XXII, known as the “cloture rule,”
guarantees that we can meet our obligation to conduct the kind of debate
necessary to ensure that candidates for the judiciary have broad support.

According to the Congressional Research Service, cloture motions, which
require a super-majority vote to proceed, were filed and brought to a vote
on 14 appeals court nominations from 1980 to 2000. Although cloture was
invoked in each of these instances, it was not invoked in 1968, when the
Senate filibustered President Johnson’s nomination of Abe Fortas to be
Chief Justice of the United States Supreme Court.

Any attempt to bypass the use of the filibuster now would undermine a
fundamental principle upon which our country was founded – the system of
checks and balances. This mechanism was created to limit the power of the
President and the majority party in Congress. It was designed to protect
the rights of the minority and promote compromise among the branches of
government.

President Bush must respect the Senate’s constitutional role in the
judicial nomination process and seek our advice, not just our consent.
The Constitution does not make the Senate a rubber stamp for the
President’s nominees. By working together, the President and the Senate
can make progress on nominations as well as other important matters.

I will keep your views in mind as I continue to consider judicial
nominations. Thank you again for contacting me.

Sincerely,

Richard J. Durbin
United States Senator

RJD/el

P.S. If you are ever visiting Washington, please feel free to join Senator
Obama and me at our weekly constituent coffee. When the Senate is in
session, we provide coffee and donuts every Thursday at 8:30 a.m. as we
hear what is on the minds of Illinoisans and respond to your questions.
We would welcome your participation. Please call my D.C. office for more
details.

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Posted in War and Terror | Leave a Comment »

Shocked and Enraged: Good for the Soul of a Terrorist

Posted by Mark on May 7, 2005

Let’s hope our intelligence services can decipher this notebook quickly.

Posted in War and Terror | Leave a Comment »

It Would Be Easy to Yell at the School, But…

Posted by Mark on May 7, 2005

On the surface, the evil school took away the kid’s chance to talk to his mother serving in Iraq. May be a little more to the story, though:

“Kevin got defiant and disorderly with Mr. Turner and another assistant principal,” Parham said Thursday. “He got defiant with me. He refused to leave Mr. Turner’s office. When a kid becomes out of control like that they can either be arrested or suspended for 10 days. Now being that his mother is in Iraq, we’re not trying to cause her any undue hardship; he was suspended for 10 days.”

Wendall Turner is another assistant principal at Spencer.

Parham said the student used profanity when he was taken into the office. He said he tried to work out something with the student. But Francois said he was too frustrated he couldn’t answer the phone when his mother called him the second time.

“I even asked Kevin, ‘You know we can try to work something out to where if your mother wants to call you she can call you at the school,'” Parham said. “So we’ve tried to work with Kevin and we’re going to continue to try to work with Kevin and his mother and his relatives. In the course of good order and discipline, we have to abide by our policy.”

Francois admitted he was partially at fault for his behavior but said he should have been allowed to talk to his mother.

“I was mad at the time, but I feel now maybe I should’ve went about it differently,” he said. “Maybe I should’ve just waited outside to pick up the phone. But I don’t I feel I should’ve changed any of my actions. I feel I was right by not hanging up the phone.”

Maybe he should’ve went about it differently?!?! The teacher should not have grabbed the phone, if that’s what happened. But it sounds like the kid isn’t exactly without fault here either. According to reports on the radio, the suspension has been dropped to 3 days. That’s more reasonable, considering the circumstances.

Posted in War and Terror | Leave a Comment »

What this Neocon is…

Posted by zaphriel on May 7, 2005

According to Wikipedia a neoconservative is a somewhat controversial term referring to the political goals and ideology of the “new conservatives”. Now as some of my consistent readers know, I was unaware of the controversy of the “Label” when I chose the name. I simply used my etymology skills and derived that Neo Con meant new conservative, in this case I was both right and wrong. I am a Neocon in the sense of being a former “leftist” and now being a conservative.

I think the root of the anger the lefties feel towards my type of Neocon is that we are seen as traitors to the movement. I find that unfortunate, because I see it as simply “waking up” and realizing that the most good can be done by the individual contributing to a cause via charitable organizations (religious or otherwise), and that the less the government controls our business the better off we all are. When the state becomes the charity, no-one gets anything out of it, except the state. I will rant later about how the state is a self feeding pig, but now I will just say, that for the most part Strauss and the people who followed him, were full of crap (i.e. his”Universal principles of right” and “Gaining power through deceit”). Most of the “new conservatives” , or at least ME anyway, are neither dangerous nor maniacal are just people who want to live in a better world but we don’t want it ” forced” on us by the state.

From now on I will wear the label without shame. I know who I am, and what I believe. If you have a problem with that, then Vote, if you don’t, Then PLEASE VOTE.

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a Comment »

A Letter From Dick Durbin

Posted by Mark on May 7, 2005

Wow! What an honor! A form letter from one of my two senators from Illinois. It starts with the lie that he appreciates hearing from me, and ends with the lie that he will keep my views in mind in voting for Judicial Nominees. Everything in between is just Democratic talking points. I’d write him back, but his next form letter would have a hard time getting past my spam filters.

But, if I’m ever in Washington at 8:30 AM on a Thursday, you can just bet I’ll stop in for Coffee and Donuts so he and Senator Obama can hear what’s on the mind of this particular Illinoisan…yessiree, I’ve got a thing or two on my mind to tell my Senators from The People’s Republic of Illinois…much of it relatively profanity free.

May 3, 2005

Dear Mr. :

Thank you for contacting me about President Bush’s judicial nominees. I
appreciate hearing from you.

I have voted to approve more than 90% of President Bush’s district and
circuit court nominees. The vast majority of his judicial nominees � more
than 200 of them � have been confirmed by the Senate.

As a member of the Senate Judiciary Committee, I carefully review the
merits of each nominee. During this process, I evaluate the nominee’s
past record, professional competence, integrity, temperament, and judicial
philosophy; his or her commitment to upholding the rights and protections
established by the Constitution, the Bill of Rights, and subsequent laws;
and the background information and testimony collected in the course of
the candidate’s confirmation hearings.

Throughout its history, the Senate has encouraged thorough debate on
important matters. Senate Rule XXII, known as the “cloture rule,”
guarantees that we can meet our obligation to conduct the kind of debate
necessary to ensure that candidates for the judiciary have broad support.

According to the Congressional Research Service, cloture motions, which
require a super-majority vote to proceed, were filed and brought to a vote
on 14 appeals court nominations from 1980 to 2000. Although cloture was
invoked in each of these instances, it was not invoked in 1968, when the
Senate filibustered President Johnson’s nomination of Abe Fortas to be
Chief Justice of the United States Supreme Court.

Any attempt to bypass the use of the filibuster now would undermine a
fundamental principle upon which our country was founded – the system of
checks and balances. This mechanism was created to limit the power of the
President and the majority party in Congress. It was designed to protect
the rights of the minority and promote compromise among the branches of
government.

President Bush must respect the Senate’s constitutional role in the
judicial nomination process and seek our advice, not just our consent.
The Constitution does not make the Senate a rubber stamp for the
President’s nominees. By working together, the President and the Senate
can make progress on nominations as well as other important matters.

I will keep your views in mind as I continue to consider judicial
nominations. Thank you again for contacting me.

Sincerely,

Richard J. Durbin
United States Senator

RJD/el

P.S. If you are ever visiting Washington, please feel free to join Senator
Obama and me at our weekly constituent coffee. When the Senate is in
session, we provide coffee and donuts every Thursday at 8:30 a.m. as we
hear what is on the minds of Illinoisans and respond to your questions.
We would welcome your participation. Please call my D.C. office for more
details.

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a Comment »

Shocked and Enraged: Good for the Soul of a Terrorist

Posted by Mark on May 7, 2005

Let’s hope our intelligence services can decipher this notebook quickly.

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a Comment »

It Would Be Easy to Yell at the School, But…

Posted by Mark on May 7, 2005

On the surface, the evil school took away the kid’s chance to talk to his mother serving in Iraq. May be a little more to the story, though:

“Kevin got defiant and disorderly with Mr. Turner and another assistant principal,” Parham said Thursday. “He got defiant with me. He refused to leave Mr. Turner’s office. When a kid becomes out of control like that they can either be arrested or suspended for 10 days. Now being that his mother is in Iraq, we’re not trying to cause her any undue hardship; he was suspended for 10 days.”

Wendall Turner is another assistant principal at Spencer.

Parham said the student used profanity when he was taken into the office. He said he tried to work out something with the student. But Francois said he was too frustrated he couldn’t answer the phone when his mother called him the second time.

“I even asked Kevin, ‘You know we can try to work something out to where if your mother wants to call you she can call you at the school,'” Parham said. “So we’ve tried to work with Kevin and we’re going to continue to try to work with Kevin and his mother and his relatives. In the course of good order and discipline, we have to abide by our policy.”

Francois admitted he was partially at fault for his behavior but said he should have been allowed to talk to his mother.

“I was mad at the time, but I feel now maybe I should’ve went about it differently,” he said. “Maybe I should’ve just waited outside to pick up the phone. But I don’t I feel I should’ve changed any of my actions. I feel I was right by not hanging up the phone.”

Maybe he should’ve went about it differently?!?! The teacher should not have grabbed the phone, if that’s what happened. But it sounds like the kid isn’t exactly without fault here either. According to reports on the radio, the suspension has been dropped to 3 days. That’s more reasonable, considering the circumstances.

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a Comment »