Liberty Just in Case

A Dialogue for the September 12th World

Archive for April 3rd, 2005

Still experimenting with BlogWriter.

Posted by Mark on April 3, 2005

Links should work like this. Very cool!

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Experimenting with BlogWriter

Posted by Mark on April 3, 2005

This is a new WYSIWYG app to publish my posts. We’ll see how well it works. It’s supposed to be a great way to do book reviews. We’ll see.  I’ll use a the book I’m currently reading, Right Turns. . Through his autobiography, Medved shows how he goes from a far left liberal to an unabashed conservative.  Not the best review in the world, granted. But the purpose is to experiment with the BlogWriter app.

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A Culture of Life: The End and the Beginning

Posted by Mark on April 3, 2005

Symptoms of attention deficit disorder include both inattentiveness and hyper-focusing, focusing on one thing to the exclusion of all other stimuli.

By that definition, modern journalism most certainly needs a good dose of ritalin.

Terri Schiavo is not yet buried; sorry, cremated, per her “husband’s” wishes, and the MSM has already turned it’s full hyper-focused attention to the death of John Paul II. I think it’s worth taking a breath, and thinking about the past two weeks. Two weeks of waiting for a woman to die of dehydration and starvation, in the full glare of the cameras, despite many questions about her mental abilities, and her “husband’s” motives in wanting her dead.

I think John Paul II would grieve were Terri’s death to be completely overshadowed by his own.

Posted in War and Terror | 2 Comments »

Experimenting with BlogWriter

Posted by Mark on April 3, 2005

This is a new WYSIWYG app to publish my posts. We’ll see how well it works. It’s supposed to be�a great way to do book reviews. We’ll see.� I’ll use a the book I’m currently reading, Right Turns. . Through his autobiography, Medved shows how he goes from a far left liberal to an unabashed conservative.� Not the best review in the world, granted. But the purpose is to experiment with the BlogWriter app.

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a Comment »

Karol Wojtyla’s Legacy

Posted by Mark on April 3, 2005

Though he took the name of John Paul II, the Pope is inextricably linked to his Polish roots. And linked to a time and threat we’ve somehow forgotten. He set his face against the Communist threat long before Ronald Reagan and Maggie Thatcher came on the scene.

And once the Cold War was won, the man set his face against the creeping liberalism threatening his Church:

We had our own disagreements with this pope, notably over America’s efforts in Iraq in two wars. But even in disagreement we have always understood that this pope was no schizophrenic. It is possible, as many who otherwise admire him do, to disagree with Pope John Paul’s teachings on marriage and homosexuality, on abortion, and so on. But it is impossible to understand him without conceding the coherency of his argument: that the attempt to liberate oneself from one’s nature is the road to enslavement, not freedom.

In progressive circles in the West, religion in general and Christianity in particular tend to find themselves caricatured as a series of Thou Shalt Nots, particularly when they touch on human sexuality. But it is no coincidence that George Weigel entitled his biography of John Paul “Witness to Hope.” For billions of people around the world–non-Catholics included–that’s exactly what he was. Perhaps this explains why China, where only a tiny fraction of its people are Catholic, remained to the very end fearful of allowing a visit from this frail, physically suffering man, fearing what he might inspire.

We don’t expect the secularalists who dominate our intelligentsia ever to understand how a man rooted in orthodox Christianity could ever reconcile himself with modernity, much less establish himself on the vanguard of world history. But many years ago, when the same question was put to France’s Cardinal Lustiger by a reporter, he gave the answer. “You’re confusing a modern man with an American liberal,” the cardinal replied. It was a confusion that Pope John Paul II, may he rest in peace, never made.

I suspect the iron rulers of China remains fearful of this man’s influence, even in death. He represents freedom for millions, both Catholic and non-Catholic. Many of us have disagreements with the Church. Few can disagree with the mpact this man’s life has had on the world. He will be greatly missed.

Posted in War and Terror | Leave a Comment »

A Culture of Life: A Day Late and a Dollar Short

Posted by Mark on April 3, 2005

Never did believe the polls saying Americans wanted her dead:

The Zogby poll found that, if a person becomes incapacitated and has not expressed their preference for medical treatment, as in Terri’s case, 43 percent say “the law presume that the person wants to live, even if the person is receiving food and water through a tube” while just 30 percent disagree.

Another Zogby question his directly on Terri’s circumstances.

“If a disabled person is not terminally ill, not in a coma, and not being kept alive on life support, and they have no written directive, should or should they not be denied food and water,” the poll asked.

A whopping 79 percent said the patient should not have food and water taken away while just 9 percent said yes

The questions asked by the other polls smacked of push polls, desperately wanting a predetermined result. The above questions describes the true state Terri Schiavo was in when the feeding tube was pulled. How sad that this poll will be buried in the media’s all consuming attention on another death.

Posted in War and Terror | Leave a Comment »

A Culture of Life: The End and the Beginning

Posted by Mark on April 3, 2005

Symptoms of attention deficit disorder include both inattentiveness and hyper-focusing, focusing on one thing to the exclusion of all other stimuli.

By that definition, modern journalism most certainly needs a good dose of ritalin.

Terri Schiavo is not yet buried; sorry, cremated, per her “husband’s” wishes, and the MSM has already turned it’s full hyper-focused attention to the death of John Paul II. I think it’s worth taking a breath, and thinking about the past two weeks. Two weeks of waiting for a woman to die of dehydration and starvation, in the full glare of the cameras, despite many questions about her mental abilities, and her “husband’s” motives in wanting her dead.

I think John Paul II would grieve were Terri’s death to be completely overshadowed by his own.

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a Comment »

Karol Wojtyla’s Legacy

Posted by Mark on April 3, 2005

Though he took the name of John Paul II, the Pope is inextricably linked to his Polish roots. And linked to a time and threat we’ve somehow forgotten. He set his face against the Communist threat long before Ronald Reagan and Maggie Thatcher came on the scene.

And once the Cold War was won, the man set his face against the creeping liberalism threatening his Church:

We had our own disagreements with this pope, notably over America’s efforts in Iraq in two wars. But even in disagreement we have always understood that this pope was no schizophrenic. It is possible, as many who otherwise admire him do, to disagree with Pope John Paul’s teachings on marriage and homosexuality, on abortion, and so on. But it is impossible to understand him without conceding the coherency of his argument: that the attempt to liberate oneself from one’s nature is the road to enslavement, not freedom.

In progressive circles in the West, religion in general and Christianity in particular tend to find themselves caricatured as a series of Thou Shalt Nots, particularly when they touch on human sexuality. But it is no coincidence that George Weigel entitled his biography of John Paul “Witness to Hope.” For billions of people around the world–non-Catholics included–that’s exactly what he was. Perhaps this explains why China, where only a tiny fraction of its people are Catholic, remained to the very end fearful of allowing a visit from this frail, physically suffering man, fearing what he might inspire.

We don’t expect the secularalists who dominate our intelligentsia ever to understand how a man rooted in orthodox Christianity could ever reconcile himself with modernity, much less establish himself on the vanguard of world history. But many years ago, when the same question was put to France’s Cardinal Lustiger by a reporter, he gave the answer. “You’re confusing a modern man with an American liberal,” the cardinal replied. It was a confusion that Pope John Paul II, may he rest in peace, never made.

I suspect the iron rulers of China remains fearful of this man’s influence, even in death. He represents freedom for millions, both Catholic and non-Catholic. Many of us have disagreements with the Church. Few can disagree with the mpact this man’s life has had on the world. He will be greatly missed.

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a Comment »

A Culture of Life: A Day Late and a Dollar Short

Posted by Mark on April 3, 2005

Never did believe the polls saying Americans wanted her dead:

The Zogby poll found that, if a person becomes incapacitated and has not expressed their preference for medical treatment, as in Terri’s case, 43 percent say “the law presume that the person wants to live, even if the person is receiving food and water through a tube” while just 30 percent disagree.

Another Zogby question his directly on Terri’s circumstances.

“If a disabled person is not terminally ill, not in a coma, and not being kept alive on life support, and they have no written directive, should or should they not be denied food and water,” the poll asked.

A whopping 79 percent said the patient should not have food and water taken away while just 9 percent said yes

The questions asked by the other polls smacked of push polls, desperately wanting a predetermined result. The above questions describes the true state Terri Schiavo was in when the feeding tube was pulled. How sad that this poll will be buried in the media’s all consuming attention on another death.

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a Comment »