Liberty Just in Case

A Dialogue for the September 12th World

Archive for November 15th, 2004

PLEASE Give Us A Playoff For Division I Football!!

Posted by Mark on November 15, 2004

This is just plain ridiculous:

Computers prefer Oklahoma over Auburn – and Southern California.

The Sooners held on to second place in the Bowl Championship Series standings Monday, staying ahead of third-place Auburn because of a stronger computer ranking.

USC is still first the BCS standings with a grade of .9808. Oklahoma’s grade is .9621, and Auburn’s is .9350.

Last week, the Sooners led the Tigers by .0567. That lead is down to .0271.

The Trojans, Sooners and Tigers are all 10-0. Each has two games left and one loss by any of them would provide a simple solution to what is shaping up to be another BCS mess. The top two teams in the final BCS standings will play in the Orange Bowl on Jan. 4 for the national title.

Since the BCS’ inception in 1998, there’s never been three undefeated teams after the regular season in the six BCS conference – Big East, Big 12, Big Ten, Atlantic Coast Conference, Pac-10 and Southeastern Conference.

This is worse than before we had this stupid BCS system. Come on. 16 teams, 4 weeks. How hard can this be???

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The Seccession Diaries: From Shot in the Dark

Posted by Mark on November 15, 2004

Great 4 part story. Remember, it’s only a post, it’s only a post, it’s only a post…….

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Irreconcilable Musings

Posted by Mark on November 15, 2004

The title alone should grab your attention. A wonderful blogger, writing on everything from politics to religion to coffee. One of those “required reading” blogs. Enjoy.

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The Final Mission of the Swift Vets

Posted by Mark on November 15, 2004

When the story of the 2004 Election is written, The Swift Vets will have a prominent chapter or two:

As the evening proceeded and one Vietnam veteran after another shared the story of how veterans felt compelled to attack Mr. Kerry for his 1971 testimony branding fellow veterans as war criminals, former CBS News correspondent Bernard Goldberg leaned back in his chair in amazement. “I think some of them are too intense,” he told me. “But screwing with these guys by accusing them of atrocities was one of the biggest mistakes John Kerry ever made. Thirty years later he woke a sleeping giant.”

Great report on final mission, and no group has more right to say “Mission Accomplished.”

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The UN Oil for Food Scandal: Norm Coleman Takes Charge

Posted by Mark on November 15, 2004

Hat tip to Powerline for this article on Norm Coleman, and the coming bombshells on the corruption in the UN.

Coleman said this week’s hearings will show that ”the scope of the ripoff” at the U.N. is substantially more than the widely reported $10 billion to $11 billion in graft. But more than money is involved. These hearings also should expose the arrogance of the secretary-general and his bureaucracy. At the same time that he has refused to honor the Senate committee’s request for documents, Annan has inveighed against the Fallujah offensive sanctioned by the new Iraqi government while ignoring the terrorism of insurgents. This is an unprecedented showdown between a branch of the U.S. government and the U.N.

The scandal is not complicated. Money from Iraqi oil sales permitted by the Saddam Hussein regime under U.N. auspices, supposedly to provide food for Iraqis, was siphoned off to middlemen. Billions intended to purchase food wound up in Saddam’s hands for the purpose of buying conventional weapons. The complicity of U.N. member states France and Russia is pointed to by the Senate investigation. The web of corruption deepened when it was revealed that Annan’s son, Kojo, was on the payroll of a contractor in the oil-for-food program.

Norm Coleman is more than a freshman Senator. Here’s the end of Robert Novak’s peice:

The reaction by the U.N. bureaucracy has been an intransigent defense of its stone wall. Edward Mortimer, Annan’s director of communications, publicly sneered at the Coleman-Levin letter as ”very awkward and troubling.” Privately, Annan’s aides told reporters that they were not about to hand over confidential documents to the Russian Duma and every other parliamentary body in the world.

But the U.S. Senate is not the Russian Duma. These are not just a few right-wing voices in the wilderness who are confronting Kofi Annan. ”In seeing what is happening at the U.N.,” Coleman told me, ”I am more troubled today than ever. I see a sinkhole of corruption.” The United Nations and its secretary-general are in a world of trouble.

By association, so are those Democrats who believed American foreign policy should be governed by this corrupt organization. I doubt Mr. Kerry will have many public comments about these hearings…

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Lightening the Load for the Next Four Years

Posted by Mark on November 15, 2004

President Bush is rearranging his cabinet, likely in preparation for an intensifying of World War IV. Both the CIA and the State Department have failed to become War departments. Both continue to operate as though it was still September 10th. Look for continued shake ups in both departments in the coming months, and for the New York Times editorial page to become increasingly shrill as a result. Though, in all honesty, I’m not sure how much more shrill Maureen Dowd can get without being place in restraints for her own safety….

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The Specter in the Victory Responds

Posted by Mark on November 15, 2004

National Review Online has been leading the charge to keep Arlen Specter out of the chairman’s seat of the Senate Judiciary Committee. Read Specter’s letter, and NRO’s response. I still think Hugh Hewitt is right on this issue. The old saying is true: “Keep your friends close, and your enemies even closer.” For conservatives, keeping Arlen Specter close is far better than risking him going the Jim Jeffords route, and taking Snow, Collins, Chaffee and maybe even Hagel with him.

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Election Reflections: More on Moral Values.

Posted by Mark on November 15, 2004

And their non-impact on the election:

The ritualistic condemnation of Christian fundamentalists neglects two things. The first: Secularists are just as likely to provoke moral outrage as are religious believers, yet we rarely read stories about the secular left. The second: Research shows that organizations of Christian fundamentalists are hardly made up of fire-breathers but rather are organizations whose members practice consensual politics and rely on appeals to widely shared constitutional principles.

As long as the left continues to use Christians as a convenient scapegoat, they won’t understand the real reasons why they lost a close election.

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The Final Mission of the Swift Vets

Posted by Mark on November 15, 2004

When the story of the 2004 Election is written, The Swift Vets will have a prominent chapter or two:

As the evening proceeded and one Vietnam veteran after another shared the story of how veterans felt compelled to attack Mr. Kerry for his 1971 testimony branding fellow veterans as war criminals, former CBS News correspondent Bernard Goldberg leaned back in his chair in amazement. “I think some of them are too intense,” he told me. “But screwing with these guys by accusing them of atrocities was one of the biggest mistakes John Kerry ever made. Thirty years later he woke a sleeping giant.”

Great report on final mission, and no group has more right to say “Mission Accomplished.”

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a Comment »

The UN Oil for Food Scandal: Norm Coleman Takes Charge

Posted by Mark on November 15, 2004

Hat tip to Powerline for this article on Norm Coleman, and the coming bombshells on the corruption in the UN.

Coleman said this week’s hearings will show that ”the scope of the ripoff” at the U.N. is substantially more than the widely reported $10 billion to $11 billion in graft. But more than money is involved. These hearings also should expose the arrogance of the secretary-general and his bureaucracy. At the same time that he has refused to honor the Senate committee’s request for documents, Annan has inveighed against the Fallujah offensive sanctioned by the new Iraqi government while ignoring the terrorism of insurgents. This is an unprecedented showdown between a branch of the U.S. government and the U.N.

The scandal is not complicated. Money from Iraqi oil sales permitted by the Saddam Hussein regime under U.N. auspices, supposedly to provide food for Iraqis, was siphoned off to middlemen. Billions intended to purchase food wound up in Saddam’s hands for the purpose of buying conventional weapons. The complicity of U.N. member states France and Russia is pointed to by the Senate investigation. The web of corruption deepened when it was revealed that Annan’s son, Kojo, was on the payroll of a contractor in the oil-for-food program.

Norm Coleman is more than a freshman Senator. Here’s the end of Robert Novak’s peice:

The reaction by the U.N. bureaucracy has been an intransigent defense of its stone wall. Edward Mortimer, Annan’s director of communications, publicly sneered at the Coleman-Levin letter as ”very awkward and troubling.” Privately, Annan’s aides told reporters that they were not about to hand over confidential documents to the Russian Duma and every other parliamentary body in the world.

But the U.S. Senate is not the Russian Duma. These are not just a few right-wing voices in the wilderness who are confronting Kofi Annan. ”In seeing what is happening at the U.N.,” Coleman told me, ”I am more troubled today than ever. I see a sinkhole of corruption.” The United Nations and its secretary-general are in a world of trouble.

By association, so are those Democrats who believed American foreign policy should be governed by this corrupt organization. I doubt Mr. Kerry will have many public comments about these hearings…

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a Comment »